Category Archives: Chimney Covers

A proper chimney always has a proper cover. Your chimney cover will help you keep out the rain as well as pesky critters. Read the articles below by High’s Chimney to learn about chimney caps, chase covers, and top-sealing dampers.

Your Source for Fireplace and Chimney Information

The following library of information is broken up in a way that will educate you on your chimney so you know how your chimney should be properly cleaned, maintained, and/or repaired. If you can’t find what you’re looking for, leave us a note in the comments and we will try to find you an answer!

The Basics

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Animals and Birds Inside Your Chimney

racoon in chimneyA number of factors go into maintaining both the safety and overall condition of your chimney.  We know that hazards like residue buildup can cause problems, but many of us don’t remember the smaller nuisances—chimney pests.  A number of unwanted critters can find their way into your chimney, so let’s talk about what those are and how to rid yourself of them.

Birds in the Chimney

chimney swiftIf there is an opening in your chimney, birds often find it tempting to make their way inside.  One notable pest affecting residents in the Washington DC area is the chimney swift.  Chimney swifts are little brownish black birds with a penchant for building nests the chimney.  Unfortunately, once a swift makes its way into your chimney, you’ll likely be stuck with it for a few weeks, as chimney swift chicks hang about the nest for 14-18 days.  Having these birds in the chimney can be quite annoying—they’re vocal little buggers!

When you find yourself plagued by chimney swifts, which are classified as a Threatened species, there isn’t much that you may legally do about it.  The Migratory Bird Treaty Act, a federal regulation, prevents removal of chimney swift eggs and chicks.  To remove the birds by means chemical or otherwise would require a permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  The best you can do with swifts is to clean up after they’ve gone.  Technicians can be called in later to clean up and remove nest remnants from the chimney. Chimney swifts and most other birds are less likely to return to a nesting location if the nest has been removed.

Animals in the Chimney

Several animals can get into your chimney, including squirrels and bats.  A particularly pesky intruder in the DC area is the raccoon.  Raccoons, usually females, make their way into chimneys to birth and care for pups.  Crafty as they are, mother raccoons sometimes succeed in not only getting inside the chimney, but passing through the smoke shelf or chimney damper right above the fireplace.  If they’ve gotten this far, there’s a good chance of eventually making their way into your home.  If not, you’ll likely have to at least contend with various animal odors.

raccoons in chimneyA raccoon is an animal you never want to have hanging around, as they are notorious for carrying a variety of diseases.  Raccoons are home to bugs like fleas and ticks, which you or your pets can get, and also diseases like rabies and roundworm.

raccoon in trapLuckily, there are ways to remove mama and her babies from the chimney.  If you don’t mind the smell, items like predator urine may get rid of raccoons.  A humane method of removal is the live trap. Raccoon trapping is legal in Washington DC, Maryland, and Virginia, and several services are available. You’ll likely want to trap the mother while she passes through the chimney liner or even attempt to scare her out in some manner.  The babies don’t put up much of a fight quite yet, so it’s pretty simple to reach up the fireplaces and grab them.

The Ultimate Protection

The absolute best way to protect your chimney, fireplace, and ultimately your home from pest intrusion is to make sure you have a chimney cap.  If the top of the chimney is not closed off, you’re just asking for something to get inside it.  The best bet is to install a chimney cap that has an attached wire netting that will act as an additional barrier between pests and the chimney.

Obviously several chimney animals wish to invade your home, and they can be quite a nuisance. From loud chirping to unpleasant odors, these pests can create huge problems.  Take proper measures to protect your home.  Doing this will ensure that you won’t have to deal with birds or raccoons in the first place!

Image sources: mainstreetj.com, birdspix.com, and humanesociety.org
Chimney Crown with Flue Caps

Chimney Caps and Chimney Crowns: Chimney Masonry Maintenance 101

Chimney Caps & Chimney Crowns: Essential to Masonry Chimney Maintenance

Proper maintenance of masonry chimneys extends past the brick work. Chimney caps and chimney crowns are both important for the longevity of your masonry and the safety of your home. Both caps and crowns help protect your masonry chimney interior and flue from precipitation, and the damage freeze and thaw cycles cause.

Chimney Crown with Flue Caps

Chimney with crown and 2 capped flues

Chimney Crowns

The chimney crown is placed atop the masonry chimney as a form of protection against the weather. As crowns withstand a lot of abuse, they need to be made out of a solid material; most commonly, chimney crowns are made of poured concrete and free from cracks and crumbling.

As its primary purpose is to protect your chimney, it should overhang the masonry by at least 2 inches. The top should gently slope away from the chimney opening, encouraging precipitation to run away from the chimney interior. The overhang prevents this water from running down the masonry, and a slight ridge build into the underside of the masonry further encourages the water to drip onto the roof rather than reach the masonry.

Chimney Caps

Copper Chimney Cap

Jim and a shiny new copper chimney cap

Chimney crowns do not cover the chimney interior. Chimney caps serve this purpose. Generally made of metal, they are installed just inside the chimney opening and extend well above the chimney to allow proper venting and draft. They prevent water from falling directly into your chimney, and also help keep out birds and small animals attracted to the warmth.

While most chimney caps are relatively simple, they are not always interchangeable. Chimney caps can affect your chimneys draft and certain styles work better than others with different vent sources.

For example, wood burning fireplaces or fireplace inserts produce creosote and other combustible solids. Not only will these accumulate in your flue, they will also build up your chimney cap. This is specifically a problem if your chimney cap has a protective mesh. As it accumulates, it causes draft problems that can make your fireplace unpleasant and unsafe.

Top Sealing Dampers

Top Sealing Damper

Up close and personal with a top sealing damper

In addition to simple cap styles, you have the option of added functionality. Top sealing dampers, otherwise known as “Top Dampers”, serve the function of both cap and damper. They affix to the top of your chimney much like any other cap, but can be opened and closed to allow venting. These easy to use top sealing dampers are connected to a switch near the fireplace, and with a quick pull of a lever the damper opens and closes. They’re constructed to prevent small animals from entering the chimney when open while shedding most rain, and to seal tight against water and air when closed.

While these top sealing dampers are of particular interest in older homes where the original damper is missing or broken, they can be of great benefit to most homes. They increase energy efficiency by preventing heat loss and down drafts. Relatively simple to install, most homeowners are surprised by how much top sealing dampers can save them in energy costs.

Chimney caps and crowns are an important component of masonry chimney maintenance. If you have any questions about chimney caps, crowns, or top sealing dampers, contact a trusted chimney professional. And of course, if you’re in the market for a trusty chimney professional in the Washington D.C. area, we’d love to work with you to ensure your chimney is safe and functional.

How Many Things Can You Put On One Chimney? Or Multiple Appliance Venting

Let’s start with a few definitions.

chimney flue ventingAppliances include fireplaces, woodstoves, furnaces, boilers, pellet stoves, hot water heaters, etc. They’re all individual appliances.

A chimney is a structure that has one or more flues in it.

A flue is simply the chimney passageway that vents the fumes from whatever is attached to it. (A flue is not the same as a damper either; a damper is something that can block the flue.)is simply the chimney passageway that vents the fumes from whatever is attached to it. (A flue is not the same as a damper either; a damper is something that can block the flue.)

How many appliances can you have per chimney?

And even though the question always comes across as “how many on one chimney?” let’s make sure to discuss “how many on one flue?” The answer to the question is: “It Depends”.

The rules are found in various NFPA standards and in the IRC (International Residential Code.) This article is general in nature but for those who want to drill down into the details, most of the information can be found in IRC chapters 10, 13, 18 and 24.

Solid fuel burning appliances.

Solid fuel includes coal or corn or cherry pits, but for most of us that means cord wood or pellets. The rule here is easy and clear.

IRC M1801.12 (PDF Here) Multiple solid fuel prohibited. A solid-fuel-burning appliance or fireplace shall not connect to a chimney passageway venting another appliance.

In other words, only one appliance per flue, period. It goes without saying, I hope, that gas or oil appliances cannot be vented into a flue which also vents a solid fuel appliance. EVERY SOLID FUEL APPLANCE GETS ITS OWN VENT!

How about hooking up a woodstove into an existing masonry fireplace flue?

That’s OK as long as:

  • The fireplace has been blocked off. Remember, only one appliance per flue!
  • The liner for the woodstove has to be properly sized, which generally means the same size as the collar-size coming from the appliance.
  • Make sure the chimney is clear of combustible materials before inserting the smaller liner.

Gas and Oil Appliance Venting

Gas fireplaces are factory-built systems. The manufacturer’s listing and instructions will preclude attaching any other appliances to it.

Multiple gas or oil furnaces or boilers, as well as hot water heaters, can be vented into one flue. There are a few rules to mention:

  • The rules apply to listed appliances. While I have never seen an unlisted gas or oil furnace in my life, if you have one, you are referred back to the rules for solid fuel burning appliances- one per flue.
  • If venting two or more appliances on the same flue, you have to know the flue can handle it, as determined but the BTU input and other factors.
  • Both or all appliances have to be on the same floor. So, no furnaces in the basement or room heaters on the second level of your home.
  • The connectors for the appliances have to be offset. They can’t come into the flue at the same height, and especially never directly across from each other.
  • The smaller of the two connectors go into the flue above the larger one (usually meaning the hot water heater).
  • As a general rule, don’t mix “natural draft” appliances and “fan assisted” appliances on the same flue. This rule is more complicated than this, but if this is your case, be sure you refer to the manufacturer’s instructions. Call an HVAC company and make them show you to your satisfaction it’s right. Don’t take anyone’s word for it, see it in writing.

The NFPA 54 (Gas) and the NFPA 31 (Oil) show diagrams in great detail, and cover sizing the connectors as well (connectors are the smoke pipes that carry the fumes from the appliance to the chimney flue.)

Read another helpful article by the American Society of Home Inspectors.

Five Reasons for Chimney Leaks and What to Do About Them

Causes of leaking chimneys can usually be narrowed down to five reasons. If your problem isn’t solved from addressing the items on this list, your leak probably isn’t from the chimney!

common masonry chimney leak fixes

#1 The Simplest Cause of Chimney Leaking: Rain Going Straight In from the Top

Capless Chimney

Capless Chimney (source: hersheychimneycleaning.com)

It’s not hard to picture that. Chimneys without covers get a lot of rain falling straight down into them. A chimney cover makes sense to most people. Not only does it keep the rain out, but keeps birds, animals and debris out. The greatest value of the chimney cover is really keeping these out because when chimneys get blocked at the bottom, people get sick (or even die) from CO poisoning. While it’s true that sometimes an uncovered flue is the source of water problems, most often this reason for a leak is only when the liner is metal.

How to fix it

Get a chimney cover and have a professional make sure it’s not this simple.

#2 Many Chimney Leaks are from Cracks in the Chimney Crown

cracked chimney crown

Cracked Chimney Crown

The chimney crown is the cement part on top of the chimney. The bricks go up around the tile flue liners, but at the top you need something to stop the rain and snow from just falling in around the tiles. You can see that the very purpose of the chimney crown is to keep rain out. Cracks in the chimney crown can occur from shifting of the structure or from shrinkage dating back to the first day the crown was put on. When your crown has cracks, the water goes right through those cracks.

How to fix it

How to fix a cracked crown depends upon how bad the damage is. Most crowns have small cracks. Even small ones need to be fixed because all big cracks started out as small ones. Water freezes and thaws in the cracks all winter long, year after year, forcing small cracks to eventually become big cracks. There are excellent crown coating materials such as Chimney Saver Crown Coat which cover the masonry and prevent small cracks from becoming a real problem.

Once chimney crown damage is significant, though, the only fix it is to remove and relay the masonry. You can’t put a band aid on a gushing wound and you can’t coat a structurally ruined chimney crown and expect it to work. Best to coat your crown now with Crown Coat and avoid the big hassle and expense later.


chimney inspectionLeaky Chimney? We can fix that! If you believe that your chimney is causing damage to your home please give us a call or schedule an appointment online. We’ll be happy to help you.


#3 Chimneys Leaking From the Inside Out from Condensation

damage from chimney condensation

Damage from Chimney Condensation

I remember a lady whose wallpaper peeled where the chimney ran through the house. She knew it was the chimney because this is the only place with wallpaper peeling. She had tried everything- a chimney cover, flashing, even rebuilt the entire top of the chimney. By the time I met her she’d spent thousands of dollars but nothing fixed it.

This was an older house with an unlined brick chimney. In 1900 when it was built that chimney carried wood or coal smoke I’m sure. Someplace along the way a gas furnace was installed, but the chimney was not lined with a properly sized liner.

How to fix it

Gas fumes are very low temperature and have a lot of moisture in them. These fumes were condensing on the inside of this too-large, too-cold old chimney, literally soaking the bricks and keeping them moist all the time. All it took was a chimney liner and we solved the problem.

#4 Chimney Flashing Causes Leaks

bad chimney flashing

Chimney Flashing Leaks

TThe flashing is what keeps water from going into the place where the brick structure comes through the roof (or otherwise comes close to the roof.) There’s a fairly large gap between the bricks and the roof and water will pour through that hole if it’s not sealed up. Flashing is often aluminum that goes in between a couple bricks and bends to go on top of the shingles. Some sort of water proof “stuff” seals those spots. Though it’s far from the best choice, the “stuff” is often tar. In any event, flashing doesn’t last forever and the tar lasts even less time.

How to fix it

There are better materials for sealing the flashing now. If you get a chimney sweep to fix your flashing, tell him you want Flash Seal by Saver Systems. (As you can see, I like Saver Systems products; but they just work well, so you can’t go wrong!) It seals better and lasts longer.

#5 Chimney Leaks Caused by Leaking Bricks

leaky bricks

Leaky Bricks; Source: doityourself.com

Bricks and mortar both pass water, and often lots of it. The problem here is the same as with the crown- the freezing and thawing all winter long with the resulting damage which causes leaks in the house.

You have probably heard of waterproofing a chimney, but you have to be careful about what waterproofing material to use. When water is absorbed into a brick or a mortar joint in the summer time, the water probably dries out after a while. The exceptions might be for a surface in the shade or on the side of the house where the sun never shines; those walls just stay wet. That water does try to escape by “falling” i.e. the water weight (or head pressure) carries it toward the ground where it forces its way out of the bricks either inside or outside of the house.

If you apply a waterproofing material that physically blocks the pores of the brick or mortar, the water is trapped inside the brick. Some bricks actually get soggy, though it’s more likely that the water will just seep to the inside of the house. To the point, using silicone based water sealants may trap water and cause more damage than you started with. Use polysiloxane type waterproofing agents, such as Chimney Saver by Saver Systems.

How to fix it

To find out if your chimney leaks through the masonry surface, have your sweep do a Masonry Absorption Test (MAT) This is a simple test where a special test tube is attached to the side of the chimney and you record the time it takes for water to be absorbed into the wall. This tells you if you should waterproof the chimney.

Bonus: #6 Chimney Leaks That Aren’t Chimney Leaks

non chimney leak

source: www.orionrestoration.com

Sometimes, a leak starts in a different place but finds its way to the chimney, and then visibly enters the inside of a room at the point of the chimney.

For example, your roof might have a leak through the attic vent or roof shingle at the top.  Water could get into the attic or above your ceiling and either drip to the floor or roll along the stringer (the long piece of wood that spaces out the roof trusses and runs the length of your house). If the stringer is un-level, water can travel a ways – and even wind up at the chimney. It has happened, and usually isn’t discovered until people have spent a terrible sum fixing everything else.

Another event that could happen (although I have never heard of it actually happening) is that you could get so much moisture in your attic that it could condense and roll down the stringer onto your chimney.  This could happen if there were some reason your attic was getting a lot of humidity in it – for example, if your dryer vented into the attic instead of out of a vent perhaps, or if your gas furnace were vented by B Vent but just dumped into the attic (which would be a severe carbon monoxide risk, incidentally).

–Need help with your chimney leak repair in Maryland, DC, or North Virginia? Call High’s!

What’s the Difference Between a Chimney Cap and a Damper?

So, you’re wondering about the difference between chimney caps and chimney dampers? There’s a big difference, but as per usual the confusion is in the use of the terms.

Chimney Dampers

A damper is a device which slows down the flow of smoke. In the case of fireplaces, it also slows down the heated house air from going up the chimney. This is the main purpose of a fireplace damper.

Chimney Cap

chimney cap

Stainless Steel Chimney Cap

A rain cap, a chimney cover or an animal guard is something that mounts over the top of the flue. It helps to keep rain and animals out. While you can get a cover made out of ordinary steel, don’t. You absolutely want a stainless steel chimney cover because the other ones rust. A cap also usually has some sort of screen to prevent birds and animals out as it keeps the rain out.

A chimney cap does not stop the flow of air/smoke in the flue. There is nothing to operate; they just sit on top of the chimney and keep rain out. Caps are usually called chimney caps and that pretty well sums it up for them.

Top-Sealing Dampers

So let’s talk about Top-Sealing dampers. These dampers do in fact mount to the top of the chimney; in this way they are the same as caps, and this of course is where the confusion comes from.

The top-sealing damper is a device with a base for mounting on the flue tile and it has a lid which lifts up and down to block smoke, which also helps to keep rain out. The lid is held up by strong springs and it’s natural position is open. The lid has a stainless steel cable attached to it which runs through the chimney and mounts to the side wall of the fireplace below.

Within the fireplace, the damper cable has a handle and the mounting bracket is made in such a way as to hold varying degrees of openness. This openness ranges from fully open to completely closed. To operate the damper just grab the handle and pull it into the position you want it to be in.

Is there any further confusion about chimney caps or chimney dampers? Share your responses below.

Chimney Caps Are Small Yet Powerful

One small feature on your chimney has a few very important jobs. Despite their size, chimney caps are an affordable addition with a powerful purpose. They keep out pests that are attracted to the warmth and cozy conditions in your chimney. They also help to keep harmful weather conditions from entering and causing premature deterioration of the liner and other elements.

You need a chimney cap to properly protect this essential parts of your home. Caps also add a distinctive architectural look on your home’s exterior, which prevents them from being an outright eyesore to your beautiful home. Like a cupola over a roof, caps finish off the chimney with flair.

Different Chimney Cap Materials

Chimney Sweep NH

There are a variety of designs and materials available for this chimney component. Most often you will see stainless steel chimney caps, along with cast iron and distinct aluminum. More decorative styles are made from copper and display the unique coloring of this specific type of medal.

Essential Designs

When shopping for a replacement chimney cap, be sure to choose one that has a built in screen to trap sparks inside the chimney. This type of cap is often referred to as a spark arrestor style. The mesh (which is generally made with spaces between 1/4″ and 1”) will protect your roof and any surrounding vegetation from damage due to the heated debris that can escape out your chimney.

It’s important to find out how many flues or clay liners your chimney currently has. This number will determine which chimney cap is suitable. There are products that fit one or two liners, as well as some that can adapt to multiple flues. Look for a chimney cap manufactured for use with a round clay liner if that’s what you need.

Essential to protect your chimney, as well as the area surrounding the chimney opening, a chimney cap should be in suitable condition to ensure proper usage. Your chimney sweep will likely inspect the cap during routine maintenance visits and advise you when it should be replaced with a brand new cap.

Four Common Chimney Problems

1. Bricks cracking and falling off the chimney:

The problem is that your chimney bricks are absorbing water and then during normal freeze/thaw cycles the bricks are breaking apart and falling off. The solution is to apply a waterproofing to the outside of the chimney. Waterproofing will prevent water penetrating your chimney and the cracking and flaking of the bricks. A chimney professional will apply a waterproofing coating to the outside of the chimney that will reduce water penetration into the masonry by 99%, and it is also vapor permeable, which means it won’t trap water vapors when using the chimney. Waterproofing your chimney with a chimney liner gives an added layer of protection to this section of your home.

2. Water stains on the mantel or the face of the fireplace:

One possible problem could be water entering through cracks in the crown. To fix this we would, depending on the damage, either rebuild the entire crown, or seal the crown with a crown coating and sealant.

3. Water inside the firebox:

If you notice the inside of your firebox is wet after a rain storm then the most likely cause will be an uncapped chimney or chimney with an improperly sized chimney cap. The fix should be quite simple, install a properly sized chimney cap to keep water from entering the flue.

4. Water stains on the ceiling:

If stains are developing above your fireplace on the ceiling then the most common place for water to be leaking is the flashing between the roof and your chimney. In most cases the problem can be solved by applying a chimney flashing sealant. A high quality flashing sealant is excellent for use in stopping problem leaks around the base of chimneys, stacks and vents. However, sometimes the issue is too difficult to be properly sealed, and you may have to repair your chimney leak or crack.

A professional chimney sweep is usually your best choice for repairing common chimney issues.

Chimney Cap vs. Top Sealing Dampers

Some folks wonder what the difference between a chimney cover (also called a chimney cap) and a top sealing damper is. First, let’s make it clear in what ways they are the same.

Diamond mesh chimney cover

Diamond Mesh Chimney Cover

Both items mount on top of the chimney, keep most of the rain out and will keep larger pests from entering the flue, such as raccoons. There are important differences however.

Allow me to also explain that a damper and a flue are not the same either. The flue is simply the open middle of the chimney that the smoke goes up. Dampers are sometimes miss-called flues or flutes, but they are something entirely different than the flue.

A damper is intended to shut off- either fully or partially- the chimney flue. The reason you’d want to do that is to keep heat ($$$) from escaping up the chimney. This also reduces drafts (usually dramatically!) in the room where the fireplace is. They’re an economical alternative to repairing or replacing leaky old metal damper plates in the fireplace. The payback period is different for different people, but top-sealing dampers pay for themselves over time. They also keep rain out pretty well, though not as well as a chimney cap (explained later) and will keep larger animals out even when open.

Energy Top Chimney Damper

Energy Top Chimney Damper

On the other hand, the sides of a chimney cap always allow air to flow. They do not save money by keeping house heat in. A cap’s functions are to keep rain, debris (twigs etc.) and “critters” out, including and especially birds. The screen also serves as a spark arrestor i.e. it will keep most “hot stuff” that comes up in the smoke from landing on the roof. They do a better job of keeping rain out as well because the lids are larger. These are important functions and no chimney should be uncovered. This option is usually the least costly, especially if installed by a CSIA Certified Chimney Sweep Company.

There is the option to have both the damper and cover combined. For a couple reasons, too detailed to go into here, you can’t just put a chimney cover over a top-sealing damper. The biggest reason for this is because a damper lid won’t fit inside a standard cover. With that said, some manufacturers make a combination unit which gives you both the extra animal and weather protection. This combo also allow you to benefit from the heat savings of a chimney cap and damper all in one unit. This is usually the most costly option, but certainly the nicest.

For safety sake, you need a damper. For economics sake, you should invest in a top sealing damper. For the best of both worlds, spring for the damper-cap that provides a little bit of everything and avoid chimney problems.

Guide To Buying Chimney Chase Covers

What’s a Chimney Chase Cover and Why Do I Need It?

First: a word on what a chase cover is not:  Chase covers are not for masonry chimneys, rather they are for the boxes (chases) that house a factory built chimney.  This is the top of the box that runs up the side or through the middle of the house and above the roof.

Buying a chimney chase cover is important and necessary to the life and maintenance of your chimney and your home. A chimney chase cover is a metal covering designed to keep precipitation, debris and animals out.  It is not an option it is a necessity.

Fitting over the top, outer opening of your chimney chase, it is important to buy a cover that fits perfectly and is made to last. Chase covers are custom made to fit your chase perfectly.  It’s up to you to decide what type of material to use.

Chase Cover Material Choices

Rusted Galvanized Steel Chimney Chase Cover

Rusted Galvanized Steel Chase Cover

When it comes to chimney chase covers, the materials used and quality of the design matters. Made from aluminum, stainless and galvanized steel and copper, each of these types has something different to offer.

  • Galvanized steel, which is  always the lowest cost, will rust quickly and need to be replaced very soon after installation so it is usually best not to invest in this choice.
  • Aluminum will not rust, but is generally too soft for the purpose.  It’s often not readily available in the sizes necessary either.  As a practical matter it’s not a good choice.
  • Stainless steel is the strongest of all your choices. It costs more than galvanized steel but will last virtually forever.  Stainless steel is generally considered to be the sensible choice.  It’s certainly the value proposition.
  • Copper is truly the top quality choice, but the price tag will reflect it.  Copper chase covers are generally so expensive that only very expensive houses warrant getting them, and the wealthy owners don’t like the price tag either.

Chase Cover Design/Spec Considerations

Ensuring that your chase cover is made to exact specifications is also very important.  You should allow about ¼ to ½ inch all the way around, and the cover should be spaced off the chase by about 1/8 to ¼ of an inch.  This ensures the cover isn’t too tight to install but protects the entire top of your chimney from small animals while leaving enough space to allow for a little ventilation.  (A chase cover that’s too tight traps moisture which can rot away the house.)

Chimney Chase Cover

Chase Cover Design with Cross Breaks

You’ll also want cross-breaks in your cover,  These look like a big X from corner to corner and keep the cover from catering and collecting water (which is in fact why most galvanized chase covers need to be replaced.)  There’s also the side drop and collar to consider.  The sides usually range between two and six inches, while three or four inches is pretty standard.  While a top collar (around the hole that the chimney comes up through) isn’t actually required, it’s a nice feature of a good chase cover; they’re usually 2 inches tall.

Aesthetics

Finally, the last thing you should consider when buying your chase cover is how you want it to look. Most home owners shop only for utility when it comes to these pieces, and stainless steel is usually acceptable.  However, more and more companies are offering customization. After you have decided on the type, it may be possible to choose a specific color finish so that it matches or coordinates with your home. This can be done tastefully and make your home more attractive, but it will also add to the cost so be sure to ask about the additional cost upfront.  Also, realize that painted surfaces need maintenance you’ll have to repaint every now and again if you want color. You could even hire a chimney sweep to complete such upkeep for you and your family.

Summary:

Good Stainless Steel Chimney Chase Cover

Excellent Choice, Sir

To recap, High’s recommendations are:

  • All factory-built chimneys need a chase cover.
  • Material best buy: stainless steel chase cover
  • Sizing: allow about ¼ to ½ inch extra all the way around
  • Cross breaks (“x” ridges) are essential

Remember that it is smarter and more cost effective to buy a quality piece now. When purchased wisely and installed correctly, a chimney cover will last for a very long time.

Are you in Maryland, D.C. or Northern Virginia and in need of a quality chimney chase cover installion? High’s Chimney has you… covered:)